National Voices in the Media

Person Centred Care 2020: Calls and contributions from health and social care charities

National Voices, the health and care charity coalition, has set out demands for genuinely person centred care. It warns that services are increasingly fragmented and underfunded, with too little voice for patients and families, and says that fully involving people in decisions is the key to improvement.

Duty of Candour Review is a Big Advance in Patient Rights and Safety

Charities Urge Jeremy Hunt to Accept Findings

National Voices, the health and care charity coalition has welcomed the findings of the Duty of Candour Review and urges the Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, to accept them. 

National Voices, spearheaded by member, Action against Medical Accidents (AvMA), has been campaigning for a duty to be honest with patients and families for several years and National Voices’ chief executive. Jeremy Taylor, gave evidence to the review panel. 

AvMA chief executive, Peter Walsh, said: 

New chair and treasurer for National Voices

National Voices, the health and social care charity coalition, has recruited a new chair and treasurer who will take up their appointments on Wednesday 26 March.
 
The new chair, Hilary Newiss, is a former lawyer with long experience in the fields of medicine, ethics and science. She serves on the board of the Francis Crick Institute and the appeals committee of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority. She is a former member of the National Information Governance Board.  
 
The new treasurer, Jean Appleyard, is an accountant with broad financial management and operational experience gained primarily in the finance sector.

Migrant Access to Health Care: Following the government’s response to the public consultation

National Voices, the health and social care charity coalition, is raising several important concerns about Government plans to expand NHS charging to migrants.

While National Voices is pleased that plans to charge for GP consultations have been dropped, many concerns remain. These are set out  below, they include the further undermining of the NHS principle - that healthcare is free at the point of use, and the risk of causing delays to treatment. The charity also flags concerns over the way the changes are being implemented and the lack of clear evidence of cost effectiveness and viability of the plans. 

Jacqui Stevenson, Acting Chief Executive of the African Health Policy Network (AHPN), a National Voices member, says: 

Measuring health and social care coordination: new research & recommendations

Coordinated care or ‘integration’ is the number one policy priority for health and social care.  Commissioners and providers urgently need to know where services are working well together and where the gaps are.

Picker Institute Europe, in partnership with National Voices, has today published two linked research reports describing how patients’, service users’ and carers’ perspectives can be used to measure integration within and between health and social care services.  Both were commissioned by the Department of Health and completed in partnership and other industry leading experts.

Francis Report: our comment on government’s response

National Voices welcomes the comprehensiveness of the government response to the Francis report but believes the impact of these measures on the quality and safety of care in hospitals is uncertain. National Voices also remains concerned that a new legal requirement on trusts to be honest to patients when they have caused harm does not go far enough.

National Voices’ Chief Executive, Jeremy Taylor, said:
“The Government has done a thorough job in responding to Francis, in particular by beefing up regulation, inspection, reporting and accountability requirements. We welcome the seriousness of the effort but experience suggests we should be cautious about the likely impact of such measures on improving care.”   

Francis Report: our comment on the government’s response

National Voices, the health and social care charity coalition, welcomes the comprehensiveness of the government response to the Francis report but believes the impact of these measures on the quality and safety of care in hospitals is uncertain. National Voices also remains concerned that a new legal requirement on trusts to be honest to patients when they have caused harm does not go far enough.

National Voices’ Chief Executive, Jeremy Taylor, said:
“The Government has done a thorough job in responding to Francis, in particular by beefing up regulation, inspection, reporting and accountability requirements. We welcome the seriousness of the effort but experience suggests we should be cautious about the likely impact of such measures on improving care.”  
“The real transformation of care quality is more likely to come from strong local leadership in trusts, open supportive and learning management cultures and a willingness to work in partnership with patients, their families and communities. That remains a challenge and work in progress. Regulation and inspection can help but also hinder.”
“We welcome a commitment to a statutory duty of candour when things go wrong but think it does not go far enough.  By limiting candour to cases where death or the most serious harm has occurred, the government is essentially legitimising continued cover-ups in many other circumstances.  We are urging the Department of Health to rethink this.”

Francis Report: our comment on the government’s response

National Voices welcomes the comprehensiveness of the government response to the Francis report but believes the impact of these measures on the quality and safety of care in hospitals is uncertain. National Voices also remains concerned that a new legal requirement on trusts to be honest to patients when they have caused harm does not go far enough.

National Voices’ Chief Executive, Jeremy Taylor, said:
“The government has done a thorough job in responding to Francis, in particular by beefing up regulation, inspection, reporting and accountability requirements. We welcome the seriousness of the effort but experience suggests we should be cautious about the likely impact of such measures on improving care.”  

“The real transformation of care quality is more likely to come from strong local leadership in trusts, open supportive and learning management cultures and a willingness to work in partnership with patients, their families and communities. That remains a challenge and work in progress. Regulation and inspection can help but also hinder.”

“We welcome a commitment to a statutory duty of candour when things go wrong but think it does not go far enough.  By limiting candour to cases where death or the most serious harm has occurred, the government is essentially legitimising continued cover-ups in many other circumstances.  We are urging the Department of Health to rethink this.”

Launch of NHS reforms

BBC Breakfast interview on changes to the NHS

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