Inequalities in end of life care

Mon, 9 May 2016

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has published a review of inequalities in end of life care. The review concludes that people from certain groups in society are experiencing poorer quality care at the end of their lives than others because providers and commissioners do not always understand or fully consider their specific needs.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has published a review of inequalities in end of life care. The review concludes that people from certain groups in society are experiencing poorer quality care at the end of their lives than others because providers and commissioners do not always understand or fully consider their specific needs. 

National Voices has been involved throughout the project, and the review uses National Voices’ Narrative for person centred coordinated care for people near the end of life as the definition of what good end of life care looks like.

Commenting on the CQC’s review of inequalities in end of life care, Don Redding, Director of Policy at National Voices, a coalition of 160 health and care charities, said:

The last months and weeks of life are when health and care services spend most time and money on us. Yet we know there are many gaps in coordinating the numerous services that should be caring for people.

Health and care services need specific strategies to make sure they reach communities that are currently not receiving high quality care at the end of their lives.

We want to see person-centred coordinated care for everyone, which means services focusing on the things that matter most to people. There is no more important time to achieve this than near the end of life. The CQC should be commended for working to apply person centred coordinated care and for helping others to achieve it.

The CQC review

Download A different ending: End of life care review.

In 2014, there were a total of approximately 467,000 deaths in England. Of these 47.4 % died in hospital; 23 % died at home, 21.7 % died in care homes and 5.7 % died in hospices.

CQC’s review has been carried out in response to the recommendation made by the Department of Health in its report More Care Less Pathway to examine ‘how dying patients are treated across various settings’

CQC’s review looks at end of life care from identification through to death and bereavement. In particular, it focused on end of life care for the following population groups:

  • People with conditions other than cancer
  • Older people
  • People with dementia
  • People from Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups
  • People who are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual or Transgender
  • People with a learning disability
  • People with a mental health condition
  • People who are homeless
  • People who are in secure or detained setting
  • Gypsies and Travellers

Contact

For more information on the National Voices comment, please contact Andrew McCracken, National Voices’ Head of Communications, on 020 3176 0737 or andrew.mccracken@nationalvoices.org.uk..

Site themes: 
Coordinated care