CQC finds many people are not as involved in care as they want

Fri, 20 May 2016

National Voices welcomes the Better Care in My Hands review published by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) which finds that certain groups are less likely to be involved in their care. Adults and young people with long terms physical and mental health conditions, people with a learning disability, and people over 75 reported feeling less involved.

National Voices welcomes the Better Care in My Hands review published by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) which finds that certain groups are less likely to be involved in their care. Adults and young people with long terms physical and mental health conditions, people with a learning disability, and people over 75 reported feeling less involved.

Commenting on the report, Jeremy Taylor, Chief Executive of National Voices, the coalition of 160 health and care charities, said:

Being involved in decisions about your care matters. It’s one of the key ingredients of good care.

We are pleased that the CQC has put this important aspect of care under the spotlight. Service providers and planners should take seriously the report’s finding that people who access health and care services the most, or are the most vulnerable, are often the people who report feeling least involved in their care.

The CQC report highlights that we have a long way to go before we achieve health and care systems which are truly involving. We strongly support their recommendations which include the need for personalised care planning, better coordination, better involvement of families and carers, and closer working with the voluntary and community sector.

We look forward to working with the CQC to develop a shared view of people’s involvement in care and commend them for publishing this assessment of the gap that still exists.

The CQC report, Better Care In My Hands, is based on analysis of CQC’s national and thematic reports, its inspection findings, and on its NHS patient surveys. It sets out what enables people’s involvement in their own care and provides examples of good practice, as identified by CQC inspectors.

Ares of concern highlighted by the review include:

  • Adults and young people with long terms physical and mental health conditions, people with a learning disability and people over 75 are less likely to be involved in their care than other groups – they report feeling less involved and other evidence demonstrates this
  • There has been little change in people’s perceptions of how well they are involved in their health or social care over the last five years. A significant minority of people have consistently reported only feeling involved in their care to some extent or not at all over this period.
  • CQC has reported a lack of progress over the last six years in involving people in their care when they are detained under the Mental Health Act.

The CQC did draw some encouraging conclusions, including:

  • Overall, Just over half of patients  definitely felt involved in decisions about their health care and treatment
  • Women who use maternity services are particularly positive about how well they are involved in decisions about their care.

The CQC review defines involvement using the Narrative for person-centred coordinated care that was developed by National Voices and Think Local Act Personal (TLAP)

The report recommendations closely align with Chapter 2 of the Five Year Forward View, National Voices’ Person-Centred Care 2020 manifesto,  and the Six principles developed by the Five Year Forward View People and Communities Board, chaired by National Voices Chief Executive, Jeremy Taylor.

For more information, please contact Andrew McCracken, National Voices’ Head of Communications, on 020 3176 0737 or andrew.mccracken@nationalvoices.org.uk.