Ready to Listen

Here's the shared example

National Children’s Bureau (NCB) has recently published ‘Ready to Listen: Why, when and how to involve young children and their families in local decisions about health and wellbeing’, a resource aiming to support discussion with young children and their parents/carers about health and wellbeing.

 

Audience

This resource will help those interested in young children’s health and wellbeing to think about the role that services and agencies play in the lives of young children and their impact on health and wellbeing, and how the views of young children and their families can inform and influence local decision-making. The resource helps to support discussion around this, and facilitate involvement.

Aimed at a wide audience including local authority teams, practitioners and decision-makers, health services and voluntary organisations, this resource will enhance the consideration of factors influencing, and ways of improving, children’s health and wellbeing. The resource keeps the bigger picture of children’s lives and their own priorities in mind.

 

Uses of resource

The resource can be used to make the case for the importance of involving young children and their families in local health and care decision-making, to gain ideas and try practical activities to gather young children’s views about health and wellbeing, and to plan for long term action to embed the voices of young children and their families into local decisions about health and care.

Ready to Listen offers activities and ideas for engaging young children and their families in the health and wellbeing sphere, and gives case studies and examples of how this engagement can be facilitated.

The resource includes sections on why it is important to involve children and their families in decisions about health and wellbeing, what the benefits of this will be, and how to maximise these benefits. There are also frameworks and steps for developing strategies, and advice on how to ensure that participation is useful and meaningful, including tables showing levels of participation and engagement from young children.

There is also a reflection space at the end of the resource, allowing the reader to explore their ideas for engaging young children and their families in conversations and local decision-making about health and wellbeing.

 

 

Population groups: 
Carers
Children and young people
Posted by...
Emily Hamblin
National Children's Bureau
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